About the project

New Performances,  2-4 October

macmath poster

FRIDAY 2 OCT, 7:00 PM. £12
WIGTOWNBOOK FESTIVAL WIGTOWN DG8 9JH
Tickets: WIGTOWN BOOK FESTIVAL 01988 403 222

SATURDAY 3 OCT, 7:30 PM. £12/ £10
DALRY TOWN HALL, ST JOHNS DALRY DG7 3UW
TICKETS: MIDSTEEPLE DUMFRIES 01387253383

SUN 4 OCT 2:00PM £8:00
BROUGHTON HOUSE, 12 HIGH ST, KIRKCUDBRIGHT DG6 4JX
TICKETS: BROUGHTON HOUSE 01557 330437. BROUGHTONHOUSE@NTS.ORG.UK


 

Macmath: The Silent Page is a project commissioned by Dumfries and Galloway Arts Festival culminating in performances as part of the 2015 festival.

ntsbrup00168-broughton-house

Broughton House and Garden – Kirkcudbright –on the Solway coast in South West Scotland was once the home of artist Edward Hornel, one of the “Glasgow Boys”. It houses a library of books which Hornel acquired during his time in Kirkcudbright. One of these acquisitions was the Macmath collection of songs and letters.  Many of the songs may not have been sung for a hundred years or more and the broad scope of this project is ‘to sing the collection back to life’.

Taking on this challenge are some of Dumfries and Galloway’s outstanding traditional musicians: Emily Smith, Robyn Stapleton, Aaron Jones, Jamie McClennan, Clare Mann, Wendy Stewart and community musician Alison Burns.

You can read about the progress of the project on the blog page

web_McMath_Project_by_Kim_AyresUnknown-1Macmath: The Silent Page is commissioned by

Dumfries and Galloway Arts Festival

The project is sponsored by:

Print

                  Creative Scotland

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             The National Trust for Scotland

Willam-grant-foundation        The WIlliam Grant Foundation

gallowayassoc            The Galloway Association of Glasgow

All photos of Broughton House and Garden, Kirkcudbright that appear on this website are taken or used with kind permission of the National Trust for Scotland.

4 thoughts on “About the project

      • This is incredible news! Child died after finishing the glossary, but before writing his introduction to his great work, through which we would probably have learned much more about his sorting and ordering processes, and more about those people such as MacMath who helped him by collecting songs. The fact that some of this music dates from after Child’s death but was related to his great search is exciting as hell.

        Like

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